Photo courtesy of KCET.

Did you know that up until the 1950s, Los Angeles was the number-one food producing area in the nation? Now it’s the nation’s most food insecure with many suffering from hunger and poor nutrition.

That’s the topic of LA FOODWAYS, which examines the history of food in the nation’s second most populous city after New York. The multimedia series is comprised of a one-hour documentary, six digital episodes and digital articles. These stories tell the storied agricultural history of Los Angeles, as well as our current food waste challenges. Just as we witnessed with the wartime community and school gardens, there are creative opportunities to bring fresh foods to urban communities.

This series is “a deep dive into the different manners in which local organizations are coming together to ensure the future of agriculture in the region in order to identify environmentally friendly solutions for the future,” says KCET-TV, where it is airing the documentary at following times:

Wednesday        Feb 6, 8:00 PM PT

Sunday                Feb 10, 5:00 PM PT        

Wednesday        Feb 13, 11:02 PM PT

Friday                   Feb 15, 10:00 PM PT       

Tuesday              Feb 19, 10:00 AM PT     

Wednesday        Feb 27, 9:00 PM PT        

Learn about LA’s Agricultural Past

Courtesy of Angel City Press.

It’s really fascinating to look back at how Los Angeles once led the nation in areas like wine grapes, chicken farms and beekeeping. Many suburban growers contributed to this food production with small acreage, as you’ll see in this article I wrote for UCFoodObserver.com.

You’ll learn about an important book that illustrates this historical time period when the City of Angels was the nation’s agricultural powerhouse.

This valuable resource was co-written by certified Master Gardener Judith Gerber and Rachel Surls, Sustainable Food Systems Advisor for University of California Cooperative Extension, who is interviewed in my article. Both authors were also interviewed and featured in LA FOODWAYS too.

Rachel told me that many urban gardeners and hobby farmers are welcoming these traditions again in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, whether they know the history or not.

 “I see all kinds of parallels; it’s so interesting. For example, there are many things going on today that echo what was happening decades ago, or even more than a century ago. People aren’t aware of that earlier work, but they are repeating it.”

We welcome that news! A big hat’s off to the producers, writers and authors associated with this important series and book.