Rose Hayden-Smith • thevictorygrower.com

Monthly Archives: November 2014

AP History: A poem about immigration. And #victorygardens.

AP History: A poem about immigration. And #victorygardens.

Usually I write about gardens, food systems, and the like. If you read my work, or follow me on social media, you also know that I think gardens and food are patriotic. And political: our forks express our political beliefs. I nearly always write about history, because that is the primary discipline (and passion) that serves as the foundation for the rest of my work. You may have read my book, my blog and various things I post on Twitter. Or on Facebook. I also write poetry. Not well, but with great feeling, ever since I was a little child. Notebooks full. A heartfelt “thank you” to great teachers like Leticia Kelly, Judy Ryder Leer Paleologos and Sue Marshall for encouraging this.

Given the furor about the President’s Executive Order this week, I thought I’d share this with you. It’s a poem I wrote a couple of years ago for a dear colleague who became an American citizen. And the immigration and garden history thing: there’s a link. Because the Liberty/Victory Garden programs of World War I were also about creating common purpose among a highly diverse American population…close to one in five being immigrants at the time.

We can learn from that, can’t we?

 

AP History

a really long poem by Rose Hayden-Smith aka @victorygrower

Each July 4th we celebrate our Declaration of Independence
With fireworks and BBQ and parades.
(We seldom note that the Declaration was read in both English and German).

We forget that grand gesture was only the beginning of a process:
A long and bruising war with an imperial force,
Years of negotiation to create a constitution
That was simultaneously a new and holy thing and also a sinfully flawed thing.

My […]

Origins of Veterans Day: A short primer

 

Origins of Veteran’s Day

Veteran’s Day began in the World War 1 era as “Armistice Day”. It is still referred to by that term elsewhere in the world, and is also called “Remembrance Day” in some places. At the 11th hour, on the 11th day, of the 11th month in 1918 – Germany and the Allied nations agreed to a cessation of hostilities. It wasn’t the formal end of the war – those details would take months to work out, and tragically, thousands were lost in the final minutes ticking down to Armistice – but it marked the end of fighting. In much of the world – even today – many of us pause to remember in silence the millions upon millions killed, wounded and forever affected by World War I, “the war to end all wars.”

“Lest we forget…” The first Armistice Day observance was certainly the reflection of the desire of people to, as one government official said, “find some lasting expression of their feeling for those who gave their lives in the war. They want something done now while the memories of sacrifice are in the minds of all…”

Armistice was celebrated with one, two, or even three minutes of absolute silence. Factories quieted, and all came to a stand still. One participant later described it like this: “Silence, complete and arresting, closed upon the city – the moving, awe-inspiring silence of a great Cathedral where the smallest sound must seem a sacrilege…Only those who have felt it can understand the overmastering effect in action and reaction of a multitude moved suddenly to one thought and one purpose.”

The silent commemoration was so important that in the inter-war years, the word “Silence” was capitalized.

The first […]